Eco-Friendly & Non-toxic Cleaners… Buy Them Here

When we want the convenience or the added power of pre-made cleaners, or for the basics like laundry and dishwashing detergents, here are some super fabulous and eco-friendly (non-toxic) products for just this purpose!

BEFORE WE GET INTO ECO-FRIENDLY CLEANING PRODUCTS…

Almonds (Organic & Truly Raw)
Click HERE to check out the almonds that Dianne (owner/author of this website) really likes and orders from this same company that sells the eco-friendly cleaning products!

Ditch Toxic Cleaners
Choose Earth-Friendly Ones!

Click on any product that interests you.
Each product link opens in a new tab.

Note- This company has a unique delivery system of “drop points,” and after you place your order online… a “physical drop point” is where you’ll go to pick up your products. They do offer delivery by UPS and USPS, but it’s at a cost.

GET CASH TOWARD YOUR PURCHASES!
Click HERE to find out how you can earn 2% cash back on your purchases from this company with their cash loyalty program!

Let’s Get Into It… Eco-Friendly Cleaning Products!

This company has products in their wonderful, truly earth-friendly collection to directly replace the cleaning products that they previously carried from Biokleen and Seventh Generation. Sad but true, Biokleen and Seventh Generation are no longer independently-owned.

Biokleen Sells Out!
Click HERE if you want to get the scoop on what happened with Biokleen!

Dish & Hand Soap… Smiley Sudz… (fragrance free)
There are numerous sizes from which to choose, so be sure to get the size that best suits your needs and budget.

Automatic Dishwashing Powder… Plant Derived Enzymes… (fragrance free)
There are numerous sizes from which to choose, so be sure to get the size that best suits your needs and budget.

Laundry Liquid… Cold & Hot Water… HE Machine Safe… (fragrance free)
There are numerous sizes from which to choose, so be sure to get the size that best suits your needs and budget.

Laundry Powder… Cold & Hot Water… HE Machine Safe… (fragrance free)
There are numerous sizes from which to choose, so be sure to get the size that best suits your needs and budget.

Oxygen Bleach Powder… Color Safe… Cold & Hot Water… HE Machine Safe…
There are numerous sizes from which to choose, so be sure to get the size that best suits your needs and budget.

Stain & Odor Remover… A Must Have… This Product Is Absolutely Amazing!
There are numerous sizes from which to choose, so be sure to get the size that best suits your needs and budget.

For Clothing… Stain & Odor Remover… This Product Is Totally Awesome!
There are numerous sizes from which to choose, so be sure to get the size that best suits your needs and budget.

Supreme Household Multi-Surface Cleaner
There are numerous sizes from which to choose, so be sure to get the size that best suits your needs and budget.

Car & Truck Wash (non-corrosive and readily biodegradable)

What’s so wonderful about these particular eco-friendly cleaning products?
This company fully discloses the actual ingredients for their cleaning products (long names and all), and this is so that you can research them for yourself. This way, you’ll fully understand the safety of each and every single ingredient that you’re using when cleaning your home.

Guide The Way
Click HERE to read about cleaning your home naturally.

Get The Scoop
These are first-rate, truly earth-friendly, outstanding cleaning products!

Click HERE to check them out!

Stench-X For Laundry
In addition to removing those tough stains from clothing, pre-treat carpets and rugs with this Stench-X For Laundry stain and odor remover. Send the stains and odors where they belong… back out!

Ultra Premium Laundry Liquid, (use with hot or cold water)
For the most part, do you know that it’s best to wash your dirty laundry in cold water? Cold water is super terrific for removing stains, and it’s top-notch for washing those delicate fabrics. In addition, cold water is really great for keeping clothes from 1} shrinking, 2} color fading and 3} wrinkling (less ironing). Also, if you’re looking for ways to cut energy costs… wash your dirty laundry in cold water versus hot water. By the way, here’s how Dianne has turned the humdrum chore of ironing into a pure joy!

Click HERE (or, click on the graphic that’s shown below) for the garment steamer she is totally wild about, and she emphatically proclaims that this is the very appliance which makes ironing an all too FunTastic event!!!

Personal Health

When consumers buy commercial cleaning products, we expect them to do one thing: clean! We use a wide array of scents, soaps, detergents, bleaching agents, softeners, scourers, polishes, and specialized cleaners for bathrooms, glass, drains, and ovens to keep our homes sparkling and sweet-smelling. But while the chemicals in cleaners foam, bleach, and disinfect to make our dishes, bathtubs and countertops gleaming and germ-free, many also contribute to indoor air pollution, are poisonous if ingested, and can be harmful if inhaled or touched. In fact, some cleaners are among the most toxic products found in the home.

In 2000, cleaning products were responsible for nearly 10% of all toxic exposures reported to U.S. Poison Control Centers, accounting for 206,636 calls. Of these, 120,434 exposures involved children under six, who can swallow or spill cleaners stored or left open inside the home.

Cleaning ingredients vary in the type of health hazard they pose. Some cause acute, or immediate, hazards such as skin or respiratory irritation, watery eyes, or chemical burns, while others are associated with chronic, or long-term, effects such as cancer.

The most acutely dangerous cleaning products are corrosive drain cleaners, oven cleaners, and acidic toilet bowl cleaners, according to Philip Dickey of the Washington Toxics Coalition. Corrosive chemicals can cause severe burns on eyes, skin and, if ingested, on the throat and esophagus. Ingredients with high acute toxicity include chlorine bleach and ammonia, which produce fumes that are highly irritating to eyes, nose, throat and lungs, and should not be used by people with asthma or lung or heart problems. These two chemicals pose an added threat in that they can react with each other or other chemicals to form lung-damaging gases. Combining products that contain chlorine and ammonia or ammonia and lye (in some oven cleaners) produces chloramine gases, while chlorine combined with acids (commonly used in toilet bowl cleaners) forms toxic chlorine gas.

Fragrances added to many cleaners, most notably laundry detergents and fabric softeners, may cause acute effects such as respiratory irritation, headache, sneezing, and watery eyes in sensitive individuals or allergy and asthma sufferers. The National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health has found that one-third of the substances used in the fragrance industry are toxic. But because the chemical formulas of fragrances are considered trade secrets, companies aren’t required to list their ingredients but merely label them as containing “fragrance.”

Other ingredients in cleaners may have low acute toxicity but contribute to long-term health effects, such as cancer or hormone disruption. Some all-purpose cleaners contain the sudsing agents diethanolamine (DEA) and triethanolamine (TEA). When these substances come into contact with nitrites, often present as undisclosed preservatives or contaminants, they react to form nitrosamines – carcinogens that readily penetrate the skin. 1,4-dioxane, another suspected carcinogen, may be present in cleaners made with ethoxylated alcohols. Butyl cellosolve (also known as ethylene glycol monobutyl ether), which may be neurotoxic (or cause damage to the brain and nervous system), is also present in some cleaners.

Chemicals that are so-called “hormone disruptors” can interfere with the body’s natural chemical messages, either by blocking or mimicking the actions of hormones. Possible health effects include decreased sperm counts, increased rates of male birth defects such as cryptorchidism (undescended testicles) and hypospadias (where the urethra is on the underside of the penis), and increased rates of some kinds of cancers. The alkylphenol ethoxylates (APEs) used in some detergents and cleaners have been shown to mimic the hormone estrogen; one APE, p-nonylphenol, has caused estrogen-sensitive breast cancer cells to multiply in a test tube study.

Environmental Concerns

After bubbly cleaning liquids disappear down our drains, they are treated along with sewage and other waste water at municipal treatment plants, then discharged into nearby waterways. Most ingredients in chemical cleaners break down into harmless substances during treatment or soon afterward. Others, however, do not, threatening water quality or fish and other wildlife. In a May 2002 study of contaminants in stream water samples across the country, the U.S. Geological Survey found persistent detergent metabolites in 69% of streams tested. Sixty-six percent contained disinfectants.

The detergent metabolites the USGS detected were members of a class of chemicals called alkylphenol ethoxylates (APEs). APEs, which include nonylphenol ethoxylates and octylphenol ethoxylates, are surfactants, or “surface active agents” that are key to detergents’ effectiveness. They are added to some laundry detergents, disinfectants, laundry stain removers, and citrus cleaner/degreasers. When discharged in municipal waste water, nonylphenol ethoxylates and octylphenol ethoxylates break down into nonylphenol and octylphenol, which are more toxic and do not readily biodegrade in soil and water. APEs have been shown to mimic the hormone
estrogen, and their presence in water may be harming the reproduction and survival of salmon and other fish. For example, in Britain, researcher John Sumpter discovered that male fish exposed to APEs in rivers were producing female egg-yolk proteins. APE pollution may be threatening fish in the U.S. as well, for octylphenol and nonylphenol were the detergent metabolites that the USGS detected in 69% of streams tested here. Such ubiquity may not bode well for humans, either: the APE p-nonylphenol has also caused estrogen-sensitive breast cancer cells to proliferate in test tubes.

Another famous water pollutant is phosphates, water-softening mineral additives that were once widely used in laundry detergents and other cleaners. When phosphates enter waterways, they act as a fertilizer, spawning overgrowth of algae. This overabundance of aquatic plant life eventually depletes the water’s oxygen supply, killing off fish and other organisms. Although many states have banned phosphates from laundry detergents and some other cleaners, they are still used in automatic dishwasher detergents.

The plastic bottles used to package cleaning products pose another environmental problem by contributing to the mounds of solid waste that must be landfilled, incinerated or, in not enough cases, recycled. Most cleaners are bottled in high-density polyethylene (HDPE, denoted by the #2 inside the recycling triangle) or polyethylene terephthalate (PETE, #1) which are accepted for recycling in a growing number of communities. However, some are bottled in polyvinyl chloride (PVC, #3). PVC, otherwise known as vinyl, is made from cancer-causing chemicals such as vinyl chloride, and it forms as a byproduct a potent carcinogen, dioxin, during production and incineration. As a final insult, most sanitation departments do not accept PVC for recycling; less than 1% of all PVC is recycled each year.

Specific Cleaners

Corrosive ingredients in toilet bowl cleaners are severe eye, skin and respiratory irritants. Some toilet bowl cleaners contain sulfates, which may trigger asthma attacks in those with asthma. And bathroom cleaners containing sodium hydroxide, sodium hypochlorite (bleach), or phosphoric acid can irritate lungs and burn eyes, skin and, if ingested, internal organs. Mixing acid-containing toilet bowl cleaners with cleaners that contain chlorine will form lung-damaging chlorine gas. Some window cleaners contain nerve-damaging butyl cellosolve. Many contain ammonia, which may irritate airways and will release toxic chloramine gases if accidentally mixed with chlorine-containing cleaners. Chemical drain cleaners are among the most dangerous of all cleaning products. Most contain corrosive ingredients such as sodium hydroxide and sodium hypochlorite (bleach) that can permanently burn eyes and skin. Some can be fatal if ingested. Lye and sodium hydroxide, which are corrosive and can burn skin and eyes, are ingredients in many oven cleaners. Aerosol spray oven cleaners are easily inhaled into lung tissue. Some scouring powders contain silica, which is harmful when inhaled, as the abrasive scrubbing agent. And some are made with chlorine bleach, which may irritate skin and airways and will form hazardous gases if mixed with ammonia or acidic cleaners. Skin contact with furniture polishes can cause irritation, and many brands contain nerve-damaging petroleum distillates, which are flammable and dangerous if swallowed. Some formulations may contain formaldehyde, a suspected carcinogen. Aerosol spray furniture polishes are easily inhaled into lung tissue. Metal polishes may contain nerve-damaging petroleum distillates or lung-irritating ammonia, potentially irritating eyes, skin or airways during use. Most mainstream dishwashing detergents are petroleum-based, contributing to the depletion of this non-renewable resource and to our nation’s dependence on imported oil. Dyes can be contaminated with heavy metals such as arsenic and lead, and may penetrate the skin during washing and leave impurities on dishes. Powdered detergents for automatic dishwashers can contain phosphates, which overnutrify rivers and streams, causing excessive algae growth that deprives fish of oxygen. Those made with chlorine can release steamy chlorinated chemicals into the air when the dishwasher is opened at the end of the wash cycle. Disinfectants are EPA-regulated pesticides that kill bacteria. Although they temporarily kill germs on surfaces, they cannot kill germs in the air, and they do not provide long-lasting disinfection. Some disinfectant cleaners were found to contain alkylphenol ethoxylates (APEs) in tests conducted in 1997 by the Washington Toxics Coalition. APEs are suspected hormone disruptors that don’t readily biodegrade, threatening fish and wildlife when they go down your drain. And triclosan, the active ingredient in most antibacterial soaps, was detected in 57.6% of stream water samples from across the U.S., according to a May 2002 study by the U.S. Geological Survey. Because they can trigger allergies and potentially cause other health problems, we recommend against the use of synthetically fragranced air fresheners, particularly from aerosol spray bottles. Aerosol sprays produce tiny droplets that are easily inhaled and absorbed into the body, and their propellants, usually butane and propane, are flammable. Fragrances can provoke asthmatic or allergic reactions in sensitive individuals. But aerosol air fresheners may also be linked to other, less obvious health effects. In a September 1999 study in New Scientist, researchers at Bristol University recommended caution in using aerosols and air fresheners, after finding that they might be making pregnant women and children sick. In their survey of 14,000 pregnant women, they found that in homes where aerosols and air fresheners were used frequently, mothers suffered from 25% more headaches and 19% more depression, and infants under six months had 30% more ear infections and 22% higher incidence of diarrhea. Another worry is that small children might be tempted to taste air fresheners that smell like fruit or candy. In 2000, 9,887 of the 11,935 reports of hazardous exposures to air fresheners received by U.S. Poison Control Centers involved children under six.